Jasmine’s Easy New Year’s Resolution: Tongue Tingling!

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Love me, love my Tongue Tingler If you’ve got my book East by West or you follow me in any capacity, you’ll know I never skip my tongue scraping first thing in the morning. If you’ve never heard of this ancient Ayurvedic practice, hear me out! It’s such a simple addition to your daily routine, and the benefits are more than worth getting used to it.Tongue Tingling, or tongue cleaning, consists of removing the not-so-gorgeous build-up that accumulates on the tongue overnight as soon as you wake up, using a U-shaped copper tool. This habit can help prevent halitosis, infections, colds, etc. and also enhance the flavour of your food, leaving you more satisfied after every meal. Copper is best to use because it has antibacterial properties and, looked after, it will serve you well for years and years to come — which is good, as once you start, you won’t want to go without it!I’ve been doing it for 10 years this February since learning about it as one my first Ayurvedic lifestyle tips and…

Parenting from around the world

Parenting from a Different Angle

There really is no perfect, fool-proof way to raise children. What helps your child, may hender another.

I believe the typical parents do the best they can. This can vary tremendously based on region, religion and beliefs. You can try, try and try some more, but at the end of it all. Do what you feel is right. Let's take a look at various traditions around the world.

Denmark

According to statistics, children of Denmark are much less likely to cry their way through the babying phase of childhood. It is seemingly due to the responsive tendencies of parents in this region of the world. 


Attributing to this equation may have something to do with prolonged maternity leave.
Danish mothers are permitted a month of maternity leave and an entire year after birth. The younger years of a child's life seem to be so crucial. It seems obvious why these practices could have such a big effect on fussy tendencies of danish children.


Many danish parents seem to take a closer perspective on using empathy over harsher punishments. Creating boundaries, but avoiding ultimatums seems to be of heavy practice. Mostly used as a sign of mutual respect for one another. Clearly explaining rules and why one must follow them. 

I hope you've gained a bit of insight as to why Denmark seems to take the cake far as parenting is concerned.

Polynesia

The Polysian tribes have taken an interesting practice in parenting. They believe in bringing older siblings into into more of a parenting role. Children young as 5 are taught to look after the babies of the family.


"Soon as children are able to walk, they are turned over to the care of older siblings."

Children are taught to be more independent and rely on themselves. Different from most cultures they are taught to seemingly raise themselves. Breaking away from a form of structure most find so critical. In order to quench the urge to play or hang out with the bigger kids self reliance can play a big role.

Could self reliance in proper parenting. We'll leave that for you to decide.

Japan

Independence seems to be big part of Japan's culture as well. Children are taught to protect and take care of themselves at a very young age.


It is not uncommon to find toddlers taking their own bus or making their way to and from home alone. Many cultures may consider this neglect. The Japanese consider it a way of life, from shopping to cooking and many others.

Harsh as it may sound, try to look past the status quo!

Kenya 

The people of Kenya seem to believe involving whole villages is key to proper growth. Making culture such an important part of their lives.


From tribal traditions, to hunting, or simply gathering fruits and vegetables they are taught at a very young age to participate with one another. Difference from western culture where the children are pushed into such activities at a much older age. I believe this has much to do with the learning experience of working/building siblings and adults alike so much closer.

Mexico

Mexican families seem to sour at the idea of 7 or 8 O'clock bed times. Staying up late can increase the social experience of growing up with parents and other siblings.


Ranging from mexican parties, to traditions and heavy cultural values they could have something here. Early bed times tend to restrict the social activities among others. A social infrastructure could be so crucial to involving children with developing trust and the importance of family. 


.... to be continued and till next time

Kayla at Way of Life





















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